Canadian wheat crop to fall by 26%

Canadian farmers expect production to return to more normal levels in 2014 for wheat, canola and corn for grain following record levels set in 2013 according to Statistics Canada. Soybean production is anticipated to increase to another record level this year, as farmers reported cultivating nearly a million additional acres.

At the time of the survey, farmers on the Prairies reported that excessive rains in late June were likely to affect harvestable area.

Wheat

At the national level, total wheat production is expected to reach 27.7 million tonnes in 2014, down 26.2% from 2013.

This anticipated decrease is the result of 2.6 million fewer harvested acres, and an overall yield decline of 17.6% to 44.0 bushels per acre.

In Saskatchewan, total wheat production is expected to decline 26.9% from 2013 to 13.4 million tonnes. This decrease is the result of 1.4 million fewer acres harvested and a lower yield (-19.0%) to 38.8 bushels per acre.

Production decreases are also expected in Alberta (-21.7%) and Manitoba (-34.9%).

Soybeans

Nationally, soybean production is expected to reach 5.9 million tonnes in 2014, surpassing the record 5.2 million tonnes set in 2013.

In Ontario, soybean production is expected to increase 15.8% to a record 3.6 million tonnes. This is due to a 21.4% increase in harvested area to 3.0 million acres, as average yield is expected to decrease 4.6% to 43.2 bushels per acre.

Quebec farmers project a 16.9% increase in soybean production to a record 990 000 tonnes. Harvested area is expected to increase 17.8% to 836,500 acres. However, yield is anticipated to decrease 0.7% to 43.5 bushels per acre.

In Manitoba, harvested area of soybeans is expected to increase 17.7% to 1.2 million acres, while yield is anticipated to decrease 14.6% to 32.1 bushels per acre. Consequently, soybean production (+0.6%) could reach a level similar to the 2013 record of 1.1 million tonnes.
Canola

Canadian farmers anticipate producing 13.9 million tonnes of canola in 2014, down 22.6% from 2013, mostly the result of a 20.0% decrease in average yield to 32.0 bushels per acre.

In Saskatchewan, 6.7 million tonnes of canola are expected to be produced, down 25.0% from 2013. This is due to a 21.3% decrease in the average yield to 29.6 bushels per acre and 495,000 fewer harvested acres.

In Alberta, farmers anticipate canola production to fall 16.8% to 5.0 million tonnes. This decline is the outcome of an 18.8% decrease in anticipated average yield, as harvested area is expected to increase 2.5% to 6.2 million acres.

In Manitoba, farmers expect canola production of 2.1 million tonnes, down 27.2% from 2013. The decrease is attributable to anticipated declines in both harvested area (-8.3%) and yield (-20.7%).

Corn for grain

At the national level, corn for grain production is expected to decrease 19.5%, from the record 14.2 million tonnes in 2013, to 11.4 million tonnes in 2014.

Following record corn for grain production in 2013, Ontario farmers anticipate a 16.8% decrease in 2014 to 7.5 million tonnes. This is mostly due to a 15.3% decrease in seeded area, since average yield (-1.7%) is expected to be relatively stable.

Quebec farmers project a 19.7% decrease in corn for grain production to 3.0 million tonnes, as a result of decreases in both harvested area (-15.4%) and average yield (-5.2%).

In Manitoba, production of corn for grain is anticipated to reach 739 200 tonnes, down from a record 1.2 million tonnes in 2013, as a result of lower harvested area (-26.7%) and lower yield (-17.3%).

Barley and oats

Nationally, barley production is anticipated to decline 30.0% to 7.2 million tonnes in 2014. This decrease is driven by lower expectations of both harvested area, down 19.9% to 5.2 million acres, and average yield, down 12.6% to 62.7 bushels per acre.

Canadian farmers expect oat production to fall 32.1% to 2.6 million tonnes, the result of anticipated declines in both harvested area and yield.

Get Our E-Newsletter - breaking news to your in-box twice a week
Will be used in accordance with our Privacy Policy
Share.

About The Author