Fridge Check campaign launched to educate farmers about vaccine storage

Farmers are being urged to check their farm fridge temperature after new research conducted by MSD Animal Health found none of the fridges observed storing vaccines were able to maintain the correct internal temperature of between 20C and 80C.

In addition, less than half of those surveyed knew the correct temperature for vaccine storage, showing there is a lack of knowledge surrounding standard procedures.

Paul Williams, MSD Animal Health UK technical manager for ruminants, explains why it’s important vaccines are kept within the correct temperature range.

“Failing to maintain the correct fridge storage temperature compromises vaccine effectiveness and consequently animal health.

“In a significant number of farm fridges monitored, the temperature was elevated to 80C for long periods of time, with the maximum fridge temperature recorded being 240C.

“In the worst cases, over 60% of fridges had been at 0 0C or below 0 0C long enough for vital contents to freeze. When the temperature is too high, vaccines become ineffective. If frozen, the vaccine is destroyed.

“This research shows we have work to do in educating customers about how to store vaccines and I encourage all farmers to check their farm fridge temperatures.

“To promote better practice, we’ve launched an awareness campaign called Fridge Check to educate farmers on the importance of storing vaccines correctly.

“The campaign is being promoted by Disease? Not On My Farm!, an initiative helping farmers take a more proactive approach to preventing disease on farm.”

To find out more, visit the Disease? Not On My Farm! Facebook and Twitter pages or follow the hashtag #FridgeCheck for more information about how to store vaccines correctly.

 

 

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About The Author

John Swire - Deputy editor of Agronomist and Arable Farmer as well as responsibility for the Agronomist and Arable Farmer and Farm Business websites. After 17 years milking cows on the family farm John started writing about agriculture in 1998 and has since written for a variety of publications and has developed a wide circle of contacts within the industry. When not working John is a season ticket holder at Stoke City and also of late has become a fitness freak, listing cycling, swimming and walking as his exercises of choice. Colin Ley - News reporter