Chlorinated chicken defines the Brexit dilemma

In the latest edition of Farm Business the editor, Alistair Driver expressed concern that the recent furore over imported chlorine washed chicken just showed that the big Brexit promises don’t really mean a thing when push comes to shove.

Alistair points out that while Theresa May has personally assured the Commons that health and welfare standards in the UK will not be compromised on the back of any Brexit deals with the likes of the US. But there is a strong core within the Government that puts trade above all else when it comes to the ongoing negotiations. He pointed out that the likes of Liam Fox will not sacrifice a potential trade deal and lower consumer prices for the sake of UK farmers. He also points out that this is not just about chicken. We could be seeing imported GM crops, hormone treated beef, increased antibiotic use and distinctly poorer welfare standards all at a cost to the British farmer who will not be able to compete on price.

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In other news in Farm Business Richard Wright takes a long hard look at the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) ruling over the recent advertising campaign against dairy farming and comes to the conclusion that the ASA is using double standards when it comes to making its decisions.

There is also is an in-depth report from Caroline Stocks on the recent Precision Agriculture Conference in Edinburgh where she talks about the future of agriculture and some of the issues that will face this brave new world of hi-tech farming. The one thing that came out of the conference more than anything else was the need for a complete skills overhaul that focuses on changing behaviours across the industry.

 

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About The Author

John Swire - Deputy editor of Agronomist and Arable Farmer as well as responsibility for the Agronomist and Arable Farmer and Farm Business websites. After 17 years milking cows on the family farm John started writing about agriculture in 1998 and has since written for a variety of publications and has developed a wide circle of contacts within the industry. When not working John is a season ticket holder at Stoke City and also of late has become a fitness freak, listing cycling, swimming and walking as his exercises of choice.