Home-grown food must be at the heart of post-Brexit Britain, NFU says

Brexit offers the government the opportunity to back British farming and improve the nation’s food sustainability, the NFU said at the British Science Festival.

NFU Deputy President Minette Batters stressed the important role British farmers can play in securing our domestic food supply for the future, during a debate on food sustainability.

As an industry that provides the raw ingredients for the UK’s largest manufacturing sector, food and drink, maintains 70% of the nation’s landscape and provides jobs for 3.8 million people, it can play a vital role post-Brexit.

Figures show that Britain currently produces 60% of its own food and this figure is in long-term decline.

Commenting on the debate, Mrs Batters said: “The role of food in this country has long been overlooked by successive governments and it is time that we recognise its importance to the nation and its people, particularly as we move towards Brexit.

“Farming underpins much of the nation including the food and drink sector, rural communities and the countryside. It is vital that this contribution is recognised in Brexit negotiations.

“The NFU is keen for the farming sector to explore the benefits of trade but we can take advantage of the fantastic skills in the farming sector and build on those. A policy of continuously buying in food that we can produce within our own shores risks undermining the work of British farmers.

“We are calling on the government to deliver policies that will ensure that Britain retains its ability to be more self-sufficient, support home-grown food and ensure that we have profitable, productive and progressive farm businesses for the future.

“However, farmers can be part of the solution for a wide-range of issues beyond food including caring for the environment, fighting climate change and embracing green energy.”

Get Our E-Newsletter - breaking news to your in-box twice a week
Will be used in accordance with our Privacy Policy
Share.

About The Author

John Swire - Deputy editor of Agronomist and Arable Farmer as well as responsibility for the Agronomist and Arable Farmer and Farm Business websites. After 17 years milking cows on the family farm John started writing about agriculture in 1998 and has since written for a variety of publications and has developed a wide circle of contacts within the industry. When not working John is a season ticket holder at Stoke City and also of late has become a fitness freak, listing cycling, swimming and walking as his exercises of choice.